Updates

SENATE DEMOCRATS VOTE AGAINST LOCKING PUBLIC OUT OF REDISTRICTING PROCESS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 2, 2015

SENATE DEMOCRATS VOTE AGAINST LOCKING PUBLIC OUT OF REDISTRICTING PROCESS 

CARSON CITY – Today, Senate Democrats voted unanimously against the Joint Standing Rules of the Senate and Assembly. Democratic senators voted against rules changes that would have made it more difficult for members of the public to exercise their right to participate in any redistricting process. Senate Democrats were not given proposed rules to review until a few minutes before the Senate was gaveled to order.

“It’s unfortunate that our Republican colleagues felt the need to exclude the public from participating in the redistricting process,” said Democratic Leader Sen. Aaron D. Ford. “Any redistricting effort in Nevada should be an open, public process, and not a product of backroom deals by Carson City insiders.”

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How the Legislature could affect your kids

Reno Gazette-Journal
By Trevon Milliard
Jan. 29, 2015

Lawmakers have their eyes on changing public schools this year.

The attention began with Governor Brian Sandoval's State of the State address. He advocated for sweeping changes: Take away voters' right to choose local school boards, create a state-run district of the lowest-performing public schools and put millions of dollars into improving what's commonly rated as one of the nation's worst school systems.

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How the Legislature could affect your wallet

Reno Gazette-Journal
By Ray Hagar
Jan. 30, 2015

Among the most contentious issues state lawmakers will face this year will include matters that could affect your wallet — including the taxes you pay.

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SEN. DEBBIE SMITH: Legislature Must Protect Women from Gun-Related Domestic Violence, Murders

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
JANUARY 29, 2015

SEN. DEBBIE SMITH: LEGISLATURE MUST PROTECT WOMEN FROM GUN-RELATED DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, MURDERS

CARSON CITY - Today, Sen. Debbie Smith (D-Sparks) announced that she will introduce legislation this session to help prevent gun-related intimate partner violence. Recent studies have found that women in Nevada are murdered with guns at a significantly higher rate than the national average.

The legislation would prohibit persons convicted of domestic violence and stalking crimes or subject to an extended protection order for domestic violence from possessing a firearm. Persons prohibited from owning or possessing guns would be required to turn them over to law enforcement or a licensed gun dealer. Under the proposed legislation, failure to comply would constitute a category B felony. 

“The sad fact is that we have not done nearly enough to protect Nevada women from intimate partner violence,” Sen. Smith said. “By toughening penalties and taking guns out of the hands of domestic abusers, we can protect women, particularly those who have faced abuse. I hope my colleagues will join me in acting to prevent more tragic deaths.”

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Workers to begin resurfacing U.S. 95 near Indian Springs

Las Vegas Sun
By Katie Visconti
Jan. 28, 2015

A $22 million resurfacing project on U.S. 95 from Indian Springs to Mercury will begin next week.

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Titus presses anew to move VA claim center to Vegas

Las Vegas Sun
By Steve Tetreault
Stephens Washington Bureau
Jan. 28, 2015

WASHINGTON — Rep. Dina Titus on Wednesday pressed anew for the Department of Veterans Affairs to relocate its regional benefits office from Reno to Las Vegas, saying the move would help the agency fill jobs and improve services.

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6 legislative committees to watch in 2015

Las Vegas Review-Journa
By Steve Sebelius
Jan. 28, 2015

As all observers of the legislative process know, the real work of the Legislature gets done in the various committees, where lawmakers break into smaller groups to tear apart legislation, debate it, amend it, and either pass or kill it.

The 120-day legislative calendar, in fact, is built around committee deadlines, and the rules force legislation through the committee process: Either the bills keep flowing, or they die.

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How the Legislature could affect the way you vote

Reno Gazette-Journal
By Anjeanette Damon
Jan. 27, 2015

After this session, you may have to remember to bring your driver's license when you go to vote.

One of the sleeper battles shaping up in the legislative session that begins Feb. 2 will be over whether to require voters to present photo identification at the polls.

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School district chief wants money for more classrooms

KSNV My News 3 Las Vegas
Reported by: Jeff Gillan
Jan. 26, 2015

LAS VEGAS (KSNV My News 3) – The head of Clark County schools said challenges lie ahead, but the district is moving in the right direction.

Pat Skorkowsky, superintendent of the Clark County School District, delivered the annual snapshot Monday of how the nation’s fifth largest school system is performing.

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Governor Sandoval Wants New Taxes...Who's With Him?

KUNR 88.7 Reno Public Radio
By Will Stone

In his State of the State address, Republican Governor Brian Sandoval promised bold action for Nevada’s struggling education system and outdated tax structure:

“We live in a state that is transforming before our eyes – with 21st Century companies, jobs and technologies that place us at the forefront of innovation and the new economy. Yet we still operate with decades-old funding systems and an education structure that will eventually grind us to an inevitable halt.”

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Nevada looks to change economic incentives

Las Vegas Review-Journal
By Sandra Cherub
Jan. 26, 2015

CARSON CITY — Four years ago, the focus of Nevada economic development was creating jobs. With tens of thousands of people out of work, almost any job was welcome as the state tried to claw its way out of the Great Recession.

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Democrats place priority on schools

Las Vegas Sun
By Senator Aaron Ford and Assemblywoman Marilyn Kirkpatrick
Jan. 25, 2015

Bipartisan agreement is often hard to achieve. But Republicans and Democrats across Nevada agree that our state’s education system is broken. For too long, we’ve approached funding education as if we were stuck in the 1950s rather than addressing the current needs of our students and preparing for Nevada’s future. Indeed, as Gov. Brian Sandoval noted in his state of the state speech, many of our educational policies and the way we fund them are based in the last century. The results have been ugly: Our classrooms are overcrowded, our teachers lack the resources necessary to educate our students and our children are woefully unprepared to face the 21st century.

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Sandoval: Despite improved economy, more poor people in Nevada

Las Vegas Sun
By Cy Ryan
Jan. 22, 2015

CARSON CITY — Gov. Brian Sandoval says the economy is getting better, but his budget predicts there will be more impoverished Nevadans needing government help to cover medical bills, secure food for their family and qualify for welfare assistance.

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Traffic safety group talks DUIs, hit-and-runs, pedestrian deaths

Las Vegas Sun
By Ana Ley
Jan. 20, 2015

Tackling topics like hit-and-run wrecks, pedestrian deaths and DUI arrests, a group of traffic safety experts gathered Tuesday to brainstorm ideas to make Las Vegas roads safer.

“Traffic affects people more than any other thing,” Metro Sheriff Joe Lombardo told the group of about 30 police personnel and community members who gathered for the meeting at Metro’s downtown headquarters. He urged them to offer suggestions because “a key component to making sure we are being effective is through community engagement.”

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Progressive group lays out agenda ahead of governor’s state-of-state

Las Vegas Review-Journal
By Laura Myers
Jan. 13, 2015

Two days before GOP Gov. Brian Sandoval gives his “state of the state” address, a progressive group on Tuesday delivered its own version, calling for tax reform and a boost in education spending.

It’s two big priorities that Sandoval himself is expected to propose Thursday in Carson City in addressing Nevada lawmakers, who begin their 120-day biennial legislative session on Feb. 2.

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